Tag Archives: Southern Ocean

Killer whale sightings drop

Thanks once again to the lovely Kimberly at Sub-antarctic Science for this news bulletin. Scientists monitoring penguins in Antarctica have also been keeping track of killer whales swimming by over the last decade.  They found that the number of sightings steadily decreased–from 120 to 26.  The researchers will report on this statistically significant decline in […]

Mertz Glacier calving leads to reduced sea ice

Mertz, a heavily crevassed glacier in George V Land of east Antarctica, has a tongue that protrudes 100km into the Southern Ocean.  In February, 2010 it split in half due to the collision with iceberg B9-B, which had broken off the Ross Ice Shelf in 1987.  The newly formed iceberg was called Iceberg C-28.  (It was […]

Good News!

Normally we get only bad news about the environment so I thought I would report about a hopeful story I read in the Calgary Herald.  Using satellite mapping technology, a group of British Antarctic Survey scientists has found that there are more than twice the number of Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteriis) on the frozen continent than previously […]

Ningen?!

Thanks to Kimberly at Sub-Antarctic Science for a great idea for today’s blog post–a denizen of the Southern Ocean I wasn’t familiar with. I’m talking about Ningen, humanoid creatures of the deep!  Ningen literally means “human” in Japanese. Urban legend?  Maybe, but check out this screen capture from Google Maps– Ningen are 20 to 3o […]